Painting and Staining

Peeling Paint

Asked By: 
Cathy O.

Twenty years ago when we moved into house, my husband painted the living room with bright white latex paint without priming it first. It has held up remarkably well with just a few touches here and there. But we recently had some doors removed and put back up and you can imagine how the paint just peeled off the walls in places. I am planning on repainting the entire room. Do I have to sand the walls and then prime, or just prime and sand the peeling part?

Answer: 

<p><img align="left" hspace="10" border="0" src="&lt;?php print url_resource(" />" /&gt;Thanks for your great question. 20 years is a long time for un-primed paint to last, so consider yourself lucky for making it this far! The good news is you don't need to sand the entire room to repaint the wall. But you will need to treat the peeling spots before repainting the room. </p>&#13;
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<p>First, using a putty knife, carefully scrape off the flaking pieces of paint, trying not to damage the underlying paneling. Also, be sure to wear protective gear, such as gloves, eyewear and a mask. When inhaled, paint can be dangerous. </p>&#13;
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<p>Once you have removed the peeling paint, sand the surface with sandpaper with a grit of about 100. After the surface is smooth, move to a finer sandpaper to eliminate any fissures and make the transitions from the scraped off paint to the existing paint smooth as can be. The finer the sandpaper, the higher its number, so pick up a grit of 150 or higher. </p>&#13;
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<p>This time around, be sure to use a primer before you start painting. Primer not only extends the life of your paint job, but it also makes the finished product look more professional. </p>&#13;
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<p>Your choice of primer will be based solely on what kind of paint you will use. For instance, latex paint needs latex primer and oil paint needs an oil-based primer. There are several different kinds of primers on the market in the latex and oil-based variety. </p>&#13;
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<p>Take a look at our article on priming for detailed information. <a href="http://www.bejane.com/articles/to-prime-or-not-to-prime-that-is-the-ques...
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<p>If you are painting the room a deep color, you will probably need to go with a tinted primer. For example, a red room needs a gray-tinted primer to reduce streaking. It's best to consult with the salesperson at the home improvement center. They can tint any primer based on the color of your base. </p>&#13;
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<p>The most important part of painting is the preparation, so take your time and the actual painting process will be much easier. More important, have fun!</p><p>For more painting tips, check out </p>&#13;
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<p>Painting 101:<br /><a href="http://www.bejane.com/articles/paint-101">http://www.bejane.com/articles...
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<p>Interior Paint Prep:<br /><a href="http://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle" target="_new">http://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle</a></p>&#13;
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<p>Exterior Paint Preparation:<br /><a href="http://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle" target="_new">http://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle</a></p>

Non-toxic paint alternatives...

Asked By: 
Mardi


I am seeking a paint without volatile organic compounds (VOCs). What I'm looking for is not low, but no toxic chemicals, can you help?


Regards,

Answer: 

<p>&#13;
Good for you for seeking environmentally friendly alternatives!. We have been looking more closely at these types of alternative products. We have found that chemically sensitive homeowners and those concerned about indoor air quality can feel good that there is relatively wide range of options. BUT – and here comes the difficult part--you have to plan ahead, since relatively few "brick &amp;mortar" retailers carry these products . The good news is that plenty of these products can be found online.&#13;
</p><p>&#13;
<strong>First, here is what you need to know (in case you don't already):</strong>&#13;
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Most paint contains chemicals and compounds that are harmful to the environment and potentially harmful to you and your family. Even "latex" paint, which is considered a safe alternative by most, contains some detrimental compounds.&#13;
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<strong>All paint has three major components:</strong>&#13;
</p><ol><li>a pigment for color and hiding powder;</li>&#13;
<li>a binder that holds the pigment to the surface;</li>&#13;
<li>and a carrier to maintain the pigment and binder in liquid form. </li>&#13;
</ol><p>&#13;
Often chemicals are utilized to perform these functions and include: petrochemicals, solvents, mercury, formaldehyde, and benzene. Lead, cadmium and chromium can often be found in pigments. Not to mention that distinctive smell of paint is in fact dibutyl and diethyl phthalate - two very volatile compounds!&#13;
</p><p>&#13;
Large paint companies such as Benjamin Moore, Glidden, Kelly Moore, and Sherwin Williams are taking notice of the need for environmentally friendly paints, and have come out with zero-VOC, low-VOC or odor free paints. But beware - according to Environmental Building News, (February 1999), "it is virtually impossible for a paint to eliminate VOC emissions entirely. These large paint companies still utilize colorants with some solvents, so tinting the paint introduces a small amount of solvent."&#13;
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As you mentioned in your email, however, there is a difference between low VOC paints and no VOC or "non-toxic" paints. &#13;
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Alternative paint companies offer a broader color selection that are low or zero VOC. For example, American Formulating and Manufacturing has developed a line of paints that are formaldehyde free, emit minimal VOC's (mostly naturally occurring), and contain additional sealing properties that reduce outgassing. Some other alternative paint companies offer lines of paints that are derived from milk protein, lime clay, and earth pigments. These are the types of paints you should look for that would be considered completely non-toxic or "no VOC".&#13;
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One no VOC/no-fungicide brand we found was "ChemSafe" paints which can be found in a limited number of stores. The paint comes in both interior and satin finish exterior grades, and it has a one-year shelf life. A single exterior coat should last 10 years; if you apply two coats, make that 12 years.&#13;
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One of the best non-toxic alternatives is Milk paint, used since Colonial times and still made today by specialty manufacturers. One such company is The Old Fashioned Milk Paint Company, started by a group of furniture restorers who liked the aged look this very flat paint gives to antiques. Their paint is made from all-natural ingredients, and based on casein, a dried milk protein. &#13;
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In general, price is generally slightly higher than a standard mid-to-high quality paint, ranging from $20/ gallon to $40/gallon. Keep in mind though, if it is not available at a local store you will have to pay for shipping too.&#13;
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Lastly, if you're truly a Jane Of All Trades, you can also make your own simple milk paint from a combination of commercially available casein, distilled water, mason's hydrated lime and borax!&#13;
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In terms of painting, when it comes to no-VOC/no-fungicide paints, keep in mind you ideally want to paint the interiors in the fall or spring, between heating season and air-conditioning weather. Periods of high humidity are bad for water-based paints, which can dry slowly and produce mold. You'll want to leave windows open, and use an exhaust fan.&#13;
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Here are a few sites you can purchase from: &#13;
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</p><ul><li><a href="http://www.milkpaint.com">Milk-based (casein) paints</a></li>&#13;
<li><a href="http://www.afmsafecoat.com">Safe Coat primers, paints and sealers</a></li>&#13;
<li><a href="http://www.bioshieldpaint.com/">Bio Shield paints and stainsv</a></li>&#13;
<li><a href="https://www.benjaminmoore.com/">Pristine Eco-Spec Paint (by Benjamin Moore &amp;Co)</a></li>&#13;
<li><a href="&lt;?php print url_resource(" index.js="">p"&gt;ProMaster paint (by Glidden/ICI)</a></li>&#13;
</ul><p>&#13;
Let us know if you find what you need!</p>

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Changing bathtub color...

Asked By: 
MFS

My bathtub is brown and I would like to replace it. someone told me there is product available to change the color is that true? Please let me know.

Thanks,

Answer: 

<p>
Thank you for your question on repainting your bathtub. You most certainly can repaint your bath tub. Since we don't know if you have a porcelain, acrylic, cast iron, ceramic or steel bath tub we can't give you a specific answer on how to do it. Though we have found a few different companies out there who have kits to repaint any type of bathtub. We need to state up front that we haven't used any of them, but we thought they might be able to help you get started:
</p><p>
http://tubbyusa.com
http://www.superjetco.com
</p><p>
Or if you'd like to get a few quotes on having it done for you, here's a site to check out:
</p><p>
http://www.refinishingonline.com/</p>

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